viernes, 13 de febrero de 2015

Louis Zamperini

Louis Zamperini: The Story of a True American Hero

by  on December 24, 2014


For forty-seven days Louis Zamperini drifted idly in the Pacific Ocean.  Armed with a few small tins of drinking water, a flare gun, some fishing line, and a couple of Hershey D-Ration candy bars, Zamperini and two other soldiers struggled to stay alive.  Their struggle was exacerbated by vicious sharks, blistering heat, treacherous swells, and Japanese fighter pilots.  For most people, this experience would undoubtedly be the most challenging of their lives.  For Zamperini, it was not even the most difficult of the war.
342-FH-3A42817
Lt. Louis Zamperini, bombardier, examining the damage a Japanese cannon shell did to his Liberator over Nauru. The plane still managed to fly back, 1943.  Local ID: 342-FH-3A-42817.
Louis Zamperini was always exceptional.  After getting into trouble as a child, Zamperini found an outlet in track and field.  In a time when the four-minute mile was one of the most elusive goals in sports, Zamperini pushed the limits.  Zamperini set the national high school record for the mile in 1934 with a time of 4:21.3.  He was offered a scholarship to the University of Southern California and began training for the 1936 Olympics.  At the Berlin Olympics, Zamperini finished eighth in the 5000-meter race, but ran the fastest final lap of all the competitors in an unprecedented 56 seconds.  His final push even grabbed the attention of Adolf Hitler who personally congratulated Zamperini after the race.  Zamperini turned his attention to the 1940 Olympics.

242-HD-150a1
Olympic Stadium, Berlin 1936.  Runners in the foreground. Local ID: 242-HD-150A1
By early 1940, Zamperini had dropped his mile time to 4:07.9.  Yet as Zamperini came closer to the four-minute mile, the United States came closer to war.  There would be no Olympics in 1940.  Zamperini was forced to forego running for a career in the military.   He joined the Army Air Corps in November 1941 and was trained as a bombardier.   Zamperini flew in B-24s in the Pacific War Theater and went on a number of bombing raids.  In May 1943, Zamperini went out on a mission to search for a missing plane when his plane had trouble of its own.  Zamperini and the crew went down; eight men died on impact, three survived.
342-FH-3A42815
Lt. Louis Zamperini, bombardier on Lt. Russell A. Phillips’ plane, examining a shell hole in the side of the fuselage, 1943. Local ID: 342-FH-3A-42819
Zamperini and the surviving crewmembers, Francis “Mac” MacNamara and Russell Allen “Phil” Phillips, were in dire straits.  They quickly ran out of food and drinkable water.  They passed the time by telling stories and pretending to cook meals.  About thirty-three days into their survival, Mac passed away.  The two surviving crew members faced typhoon sized waves, angry sharks, and were shot at by Japanese pilots.  Their bullet-riddled raft, faded from the blistering sun, barely supported their emaciated bodies.  Finally, on July 15, the two men were picked up by Japanese soldiers.  To say they were saved would be inaccurate.
80-G-42014
Six men conducting tests of rubber life rafts and survival accessories off Cape Fear, North Carolina. This raft is similar to the one that Zamperini and company were stranded on although the black contraption on the left is a water distiller, an item noticeably absent from Zamperini’s raft.  Local ID: 80-G-42014
Zamperini and Phillips were modestly nursed back to health before they were transferred to a prisoner of war camp.  The Japanese POW camps were notoriously cruel.  Over one-third of all allied POWs died in the camps and the Japanese had plans to kill all POWs by the war’s end.  Zamperini was separated from Phillips and transferred to a number of different camps throughout the war.  Always on the brink of starvation, Zamperini was treated especially cruelly because of his running fame.  Zamperini was forced to clean up the latrines, shovel coal, and was beaten relentlessly.  Due to the harsh treatment, cold weather, and severe malnutrition, Zamperini developed beriberi, a deadly disease caused by vitamin deficiency. He was on the brink of death.
On August 6, 1945 the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima.  Less than a month later Japan surrendered.  Allied planes began dropping food, cigarettes, and news of victory to the famished POWs.  Zamperini gradually regained his health and celebrated with his peers.  He was officially released on September 5, 1945, more than two years after his plane crash.  By that time the United States had declared Zamperini dead and his parents had received his Purple Heart “posthumously.”  Most of his family and friends had long assumed he had died.  The few that held out hope were still amazed to see Zamperini walk through the door on October 5, 1945.
80-G-490445
Allied POWs celebrate their liberation at the Aomori camp.  One of the POW camps where Zamperini was held captive. August 29, 1945. Local ID: 80-G-490445
Throughout his life Zamperini physically pushed his body to the limit.  Yet it is truly his passion for life and mental vitality that continues to impress people around the world.  His story is the inspiration for the bestselling book, Unbroken and now a major motion picture by the same name.  Zamperini passed away in July of 2014; he was 97 years old.
111-SC-215498
Capt. Louis Zamperini (left) makes broadcast to the United States after spending 28 months in a Japanese Prison Camp.  Local ID: 111-SC-215498
The pictures above are all from NARA’s Still Pictures Division.  Much of this blog was based on Laura Hillenbrand’s book, Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption.

No hay comentarios:

Publicar un comentario en la entrada

Archivo del blog

Buscar este blog